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Saturday, December 28, 2013

Pork Rib Roast and my New Favorite Toy

With New Years right around the corner, I thought it would be helpful to repost my recipe for Pork Rib Roast.  I hope you find it helpful...

One of our family traditions around here is Pork and Sauerkraut on New Years Day.  It is supposed to bring good luck and money in the New Year.  Being a person with a scientific mind, I should not be influenced by superstitions, but I am a superstitious sort.  So, why tempt fate.  ;)  Plus, I love pork roast and sauerkraut.

This year, instead of using my roaster, I decided to use my 9 quart dutch oven for roasting duties.  Why?  It is big enough, it is well seasoned, and it makes clean up a snap.  My dutch oven is a Lodge Logic 9 quart that I picked up on sale at Amazon for $79.  I don't know how they do it for that price, but I am not one to complain when I find a good deal.


Here is the quest of honor.  It is a 5.5 lb pork rib roast, ribs still in place...



To cook this beautiful piece of meat, it is not hard at all.  First, I placed the roast in the dutch oven, bones down.  Then, I rubbed the ends, and only the ends, with olive oil.  Then, on the top, I seasoned with sea salt, cracked pepper, rosemary, thyme, and sage...


I heated the oven to 425 F, then placed the roast in the oven on the middle rack.  After 20 minutes, I lowered the heat to 325 F for the rest of the roasting time.  I roasted until the internal temp was 150 F.  Then, we drained our sauerkraut, placed around the outside of the roast, and put back in the oven until the roast reached 155 F internal temp, about 20 more minutes.  Total cooking time was about 2 and a quarter hours...


Once the roast was done, resting is a snap.  Just put the lid on the top of the dutch oven and sit on a counter out of your way...


After about 15 minutes of resting time, I cut the bones off the back of the roast and sliced for serving...


I also cut the bones down into little tasty, hand held treats.  The roast itself had a nice flavor with hints of sage and rosemary.  Cleaning up the cast iron was a snap.  Just scrape off the browned bits, rinse with hot water, dry, and put away until you need your dutch oven the next time.

Thanks for stopping by...

Bill

8 comments:

  1. Great roast. You know black iron can become an addiction. Stay away from e-bay and garage sales.They are very easy to restore, inexpensive and great cooking tools. Your wife will thank you.

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  2. I did not even mention how black iron is great for beans or cooking bread on the grill. I am on a dutch oven competition team called the 'Meatmen". See you got me started.

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  3. Ok, I know the addiction. when my Grandmother passed away, my Mom did not want her cast iron because she had what she needed and the rest of the family thought they were ruined because of the fine layer of dust. So, I took them, knowing what I had. I made off with a medium sized dutch oven and a medium and small frying pan. Some tender loving care and I had some great additions to my cookware. I use the dutch oven for beans and stuff on the grill and the frying pans for a bunch of stuff. But, I love what it does to corn bread...

    There is a dutch oven competition circuit? Tell me more, I am listening...

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  4. There is not really a circuit but there are competitions. There is a yearly championship in Utah. They have qualification for different areas. I have not competed recently because of BBQ competitions. The contest requires three turns ins; bread, main dish and dessert.

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  5. Replies
    1. Glad you liked it...

      Thanks for stopping,

      Bill

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